Arts & Humanities

What constitutes optimal leisure?

Large sections of our society have had an increasing amount of time on their hands outside of work since the inception of the industrial age. People have developed multiple ways of occupying this time through varied and multifaceted leisure activities. These activities have been extensively researched and documented in recent decades, and Professor Robert Stebbins at the University of Calgary […]

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Arts & Humanities

Smooth sailing: Wind, water, and Viking voyages

Misconceptions about the Vikings are more numerous than facts, one being their portrayal as sailors blindly battling through cold, fog, wind, and turbulence. Through scientific research and their own voyage on the (not so) high seas, Professor William Doolittle (University of Texas) and Professor Stephen Stadler (Oklahoma State University) have dispelled this myth. Summertime winds and currents would not have […]

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Arts & Humanities

From what’s wrong to what’s strong: A guide to community-driven development

There are four main modes of social change: to, for, with, and by. While there is a place for all four within community and economic development, avoiding the pitfalls of traditional ‘aid’ requires a well-delineated approach. As the Managing Director of Nurture Development and a faculty member of the Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) Institute at DePaul University, Cormac Russell is […]

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Arts & Humanities

Philosophy and Critical Theory: Shining a light on Saladdin Ahmed’s research

Saladdin Ahmed is a philosopher and critical theorist. His works focus on the philosophy of resistance, antifascism, totalitarianism, and political space. For the last three years, he has been teaching political theory, international relations, and comparative politics at Union College in Schenectady, New York. During that time, he has published, among other works, a book Totalitarian Space and the Destruction […]

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Arts & Humanities

Cinematic cruising: Reel and real spaces between imagination and experience

What do going on a cruise and visiting the cinema have in common? Professor Anton Escher, Dr Marie Karner and Helena Rapp, at Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, believe these two seemingly different activities share a lot in common. Delving into an area of study they feel has been overlooked until now, they explain how film representations affect a cruise passenger’s […]

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Arts & Humanities

Digital Assyriology: Using artificial intelligence to unlock an ancient lingua franca

The ancient writing system of cuneiform was used to record millennia of human history, but relatively few of the hundreds of thousands of known cuneiform texts have yet been translated and made available to researchers and the public alike. The Babylonian Engine project, led by Dr Shai Gordin of Ariel University, Israel, has developed two tools – Atrahasis and Akkademia […]

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Arts & Humanities

Is the Corona pandemic a gateway to global surveillance?

For the first time in human history, digital surveillance technologies have allowed governments around the world to monitor almost everyone, almost everywhere, almost all the time. The public has largely accepted such measures as necessary in the fight against the Coronavirus. But are we right to passively accept the abandonment of our right to privacy – a fundamental human right […]

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Arts & Humanities

Artistic expressions of 21st-century change

Suzanne Anker is an artist and theorist from New York City, chair of the School of Visual Arts’ Fine Arts Department. She is also founder and director of the School’s Bio Art Laboratory, a state-of-the-art facility which gives artists a place to bring together scientific and artistic methods to create a dialogue concerning the current state of nature and science. […]

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Arts & Humanities

The knowing child’s quest in contemporary American fiction

The image of an adolescent growing up and making sense of the world is a familiar icon in many cultures around the world. Yuki Namiki from Tokyo Kasei University in Japan looks at how two 21st century American novels use the trope in line with literary tradition but also depart from it to explore family relationships in contemporary society. Both […]

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Arts & Humanities

Dear Mr Hume, your circle might actually be a spiral

Induction is typically understood as a process of deriving principles or laws from particular or individual instances. The Empiricist David Hume argued that such generalisations about the world cannot be justified using deduction (a logic-based method of reasoning), and that induction is in fact worthless, circular reasoning. However, Professor Uwe Saint-Mont of Nordhausen University of Applied Sciences in Germany argues […]

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