Technological leapfrogging the global energy crisis: How can changing the role of science in developing countries help with an oncoming climate catastrophe?

In 1975, the Brazilian government launched the National Alcohol Program (NAP) with the sole aim of relieving the country’s crushing dependence on fossil fuels with a move to cleaner ethyl-alcohol based fuels – and, thanks to researchers like Professor José Goldemberg, of the University of São Paulo, the program was an overwhelming success. Combining the country’s own natural resources with technological leapfrogging – […]

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One ocean, many minds: collaborative science in the Arctic

In this article: Professor Igor Polyakov from the University of Alaska Fairbanks is the lead scientist of an observational programme monitoring climatic changes in the Arctic Ocean.

The Arctic Ocean is undergoing a period of significant change. In collaboration with an international, multidisciplinary team of scientists, Professor Igor Polyakov from the University of Alaska Fairbanks is the lead scientist of an observational programme monitoring climatic changes in the Arctic Ocean. The data he and his team have collected is proving instrumental in understanding the on-going and fundamental […]

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Extinct giants, a new wolf and the key to understanding climate change

In this research article: Dr Meachen hopes to uncover the secrets of the mass extinction of the last ice age by re-opennig excavations at Natural Trap Cave (NTC) in North America

After its last excavation in the 1970s, a group of palaeontologists, genetics experts and cavers led by vertebrate palaeontologist and mammalian carnivore specialist Dr Julie Meachen of Des Moines University, have re-opened excavations at Natural Trap Cave (NTC) in North America. During this project, Dr Meachen hopes to uncover the secrets of the mass extinction of the last ice age […]

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How to promote gender equity in the green economy

A social research article about Dr Baruah’s research programme which is aimed broadly at understanding how to ensure that a global green economy will be more gender equitable and socially just than its fossil-fuel based predecessor.

The realities of climate change have prompted many nations to strive for greener industries. This includes the development of new technologies which are less carbon-intensive, and the overhaul of sectors such as energy and transportation where women are traditionally poorly represented in the workforce. As the green economy develops, thousands of jobs will be created, but it is unlikely that […]

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Fossilising fossil fuels with green alternatives

A science research article: Dr Jenkinson’s research focuses on using microbial engineering and synthetic biology techniques to utilise Clostridia microbial strains as biocatalysts. She and her team at Green Biologics aim to provide customers with more sustainable, green alternatives for everyday products such as paints, cosmetics and food ingredients.

Green Biologics are a renewable chemicals company who are not only changing the face of renewable chemicals, but are changing the world while they are at it. Dr Liz Jenkinson is one of the lead researchers at the company, and it is her work that is providing the answer to the question: is there an alternative to fossil fuels? Her […]

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Development of immunity in basal metazoans

A research article: Dr Rodriguez-Lanetty’s research programme will elucidate the specificity, memory and molecular basis of the defence response of corals upon repetitive encounters with pathogens.

Dr Mauricio Rodriguez-Lanetty from Florida International University (FIU), is currently conducting research that focuses on immunological priming in corals and anemones, a process by which an animal can resist pathogens through repeated, non-lethal exposure. As corals are at risk due to climate change, this is an important project to help further our understanding of their immunology. The project also includes […]

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Peatlands’ past suggests fast-changing future

In this article Prof Booth and Hotchkiss’ research uses the paleoecological record preserved in kettle hole ecosystems of northern Wisconsin to assess the potential for climate-induced ecosystem state shifts, as well as the ecological effects of these events.

Minimising and mitigating the effects of global climate change rely on accurate predictions of future climate, vegetation changes, and feedbacks between the Earth and its atmosphere. Prof Sara Hotchkiss, of the University of Wisconsin – Madison, and Prof Robert Booth, of Lehigh University, Pennsylvania, have investigated the effects of climate change on an overlooked landscape, the kettle hole ecosystems of […]

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