Explaining how the mind works: A new theory

How and why do humans think and act in the ways that we do? To answer this question, Dr Paul Badcock and his colleagues have recently proposed a theory of the human brain that combines evidence from evolutionary and developmental psychology, neuroscience, and biology. This theory posits that the human brain is a complex adaptive system, composed of relatively specialised […]

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The dawn of memory modulation and self-prescribed forgetting – a moral dilemma

Human memory is an incredible feat of the brain, storing all of our fondest memories, and all of our greatest heartaches, nightmares and frankly memories we would maybe rather do without. What was once considered an idea bound to science fiction may be a possibility, at least theoretically. Advances in Neuroscience and Psychology have allowed the idea of physically and […]

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A fascination with violence: appetitive aggression in males and females

In this research article: Drs Meyer-Parlapanis and Augsburger’s work looks at the psychobiology of proactive human aggression. In particular, they focus on the sex similarities and differences in the development of appetitive aggression.

Exposure to violence during childhood or at later stages of life can result in severe trauma, mental health issues, and in some instances, appetitive aggression, an acquired fascination by or pleasure in violence. Under the leadership of Prof Dr Thomas Elbert, Dr Danie Meyer-Parlapanis and her co-author Dr Mareike Augsburger, from the University of Konstanz in Germany and the University […]

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