When the body turns against itself: Amyloid-based diseases

Amyloid-based diseases

Often, the body is its own worst enemy. Diseases such as cancer are caused by faults in the natural replication processes of our own cells. It is thought that both Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease may be caused by amyloids – aggregates of our own proteins that can disrupt nerve signalling and other functions. Dr H. Robert Guy of Amyloid Research […]

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Timely insulin therapy to treat type 2 diabetes

Timely insulin therapy to treat type 2 diabetes

Diabetes is a tricky condition to treat. While insulin can efficiently lower blood sugar levels and protect pancreatic ꞵ-cells, it can also cause harmful side effects such as hypoglycaemia and weight gain. Severe hypoglycaemia may trigger arrhythmias and cardiovascular events. Professor Markolf Hanefeld suggests that an individualised approach to start timely insulin therapy on the basis of risk/benefit balance is […]

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A focus on beta cell mass could help prevent type 2 diabetes

A focus on beta cell mass could help prevent type 2 diabetes

Diabetes is a global health problem expected to affect nearly seven percent of the world’s population by 2035. Treatment broadly focuses on regulating glucose levels, and an increase in the range of pharmacological options means that it is usually possible to manage the condition. However, diabetes cannot be cured. Professor Yoshifumi Saisho from Keio University, Japan, advocates moving the focus […]

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The carotid body: A candidate for regaining glucose tolerance in Type 2 diabetes

Professor Silvia Conde and her team from the NOVA Medical School, NOVA University of Lisbon, have proposed a new strategy for treating metabolic diseases. Previously, they showed that an over-active homeostasis sensor called the carotid body could cause insulin resistance and disrupt glucose tolerance, common in Type 2 diabetes. In their new study, Prof Conde’s team applied a kilohertz frequency […]

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