New doesn’t always mean better: Do consumers prefer older drugs?

New doesn’t always mean better: Do consumers prefer older drugs?

With new drugs being approved and released every year, Dr Yun Jie, Assistant Professor of Marketing at the School of Business, Sun Yat-sen University China, in collaboration with Professor Ye Li from the School of Business at The University of California, Riverside, have investigated the effect of launch time on consumer choice. Using a series of studies, Dr Jie has […]

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A new generation of induced pluripotent stem cells for regenerative medicine

Dr Schrepfer and Dr Deuse conducting their stem cell research

Embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells are unlimited sources for the generation of cell derivatives for the regeneration of failing organs. However, such cell transplants are subject to immune rejection by the recipient’s immune system. Drs Sonja Schrepfer and Tobias Deuse from the University of California, San Francisco, have developed a new generation of immune-edited induced pluripotent stem […]

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How to make a CRISPR cow

How to make a CRISPR cow

Genome editing offers an opportunity to introduce useful genetic traits into livestock breeding programmes. However, it has proven difficult to insert large DNA fragments into livestock embryos using the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Dr Alison Van Eenennaam and Dr Joseph Owen, of the University of California, Davis, employed their knowledge of bovine embryogenesis and DNA repair pathways, and the help of a […]

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Inflammatory bowel disease and epithelial barrier function

Inflammatory bowel disease and epithelial barrier function

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) occurs when the epithelial cells lining the gut become weakened, allowing gut microbes to activate immune cells. Gut barrier weakening can be caused by a loss of function of the PTPN2 gene. Professor Declan McCole of the University of California, Riverside and various collaborators have extensively researched the role of the epithelial barrier in IBD, the […]

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Novel imaging technique could lead to early diagnosis of lung cancer

Novel imaging technique could lead to early diagnosis of lung cancer

Non-small cell lung cancer is one of the most widespread forms of the disease. As with many other cancers, the best chance of survival comes with early diagnosis; unfortunately, at present this often doesn’t happen. In research that has the potential to improve the prognosis of lung cancer patients, Dr Claudio Scafoglio and colleagues at the University of California, Los […]

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Reproducible computer vision.
Cross-disciplinary and scalable image informatics

Reproducible computer vision Cross-disciplinary and scalable image informatics

The LIMPID, or Large-Scale IMage Processing Infrastructure Development project aims to help scientists around the world to share information and advance the reproducibility of methods in the field of computer vision – or how computers ‘see’ and analyse images. The LIMPID project has applications in fields as diverse as materials science, biology, neuroscience, marine science, remote sensing, and medicine. The […]

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Polymeric transformer: Nanoantibiotics for drug-resistant infections

Polymeric transformer: Nanoantibiotics for drug-resistant infections

The translational research of Professor Young Jik Kwon at the University of California, Irvine aims to fill a formidable void created by the lack of available effective antibiotics. Combining naturally-occurring antimicrobial substances with conventional antibiotics, Professor Kwon’s nanoantibiotics are a novel generation of compounds molecularly engineered to safely and effectively target drug-resistant bacteria. One of his current projects aims to tackle […]

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Reduced PSA Prostate Cancer Screening: Life-threatening consequences?

In 2012, the United States Preventive Services Task Force issued a grade D recommendation against PSA-based prostate cancer screening. This is because early diagnosis of low-grade cancers can lead to unnecessary overtreatment and patient suffering. However, many epidemiologists are concerned that this could lead to severe unintended consequences. Dr Thomas E. Ahlering, from the University of California, has further explored these concerns […]

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Unlocking the chemical secrets of microbial conversations

Dr Matt Traxler of the University of California, Berkeley, is changing the way we study microbes. Gone are the days of thinking about a single species in a pure culture in the lab – Traxler and his team of graduate students and postdocs are developing a version of mass spectrometry which promises to allow single microbial cells, and their interactions […]

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